There is a significant difference between nationality identity and organizational identity. Why?

200 words initial Post and two 75-100 words replies. I attached the replies later.

There is a significant difference between nationality identity and organizational identity. Why? How does an organization’s culture affect an individual’s subculture? Describe a personal example to illustrate this dynamic.

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Yang Yu 

RE: Week 2 question

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National identity is a person’s identity or sense of belonging to one state or to one nation (Ashmore et al., 2001), while the organizational identity is defined as a sets of defined as a set of statements that organization members perceive to be central, distinctive, and enduring to their organization. (Albert & Whetten, 1985) When we enter into an organization, we will encounter the culture in an organization which affected by a great mixture of individuals personalities and behaviors which are governed by codes of conduct, moral values, faith, ethnicity, etc. Inevitably, our own cultures, shaped by the behaviors, faith, values and cultures of our own nations, will have glitches with the diverse cultures within the organization. Meanwhile, as a member of the organization, our cultures will be molded and influenced by the daily contact with its members and the organization as a whole. Our subculture will derive from the diversity of the members of organization and

Before I studied in an American university, I was born and grown up in a culture which champion the collectivism. Compared with its counterparts, American university embraces individualism and gives more attention to minorities. For instance, educational resources and opportunities are more equitably distributed, and all students, including minorities and students with disabilities. As a foreign student, I could utilize various academic support resources to facilitate my study and I can feel the respect to my individual preference in the class and daily life. In China, we got used to adapting to the value and rules of the whole group, and we are seldom concerned about the individual value or habit. Individuals tend to find common values and goals as particularly salient �Schwartz, 1990). Under this ongoing impact on my value and behaviors, I empathize with those who holds different opinions and am more willing to take care of those minor groups.

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Zihan Ren 

RE: Week 2 question

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A research from the discursive tradition define organizational identity as ‘an ongoing conversation or dance between [internal] organizational culture and [external] organizational images’ and present a model of it based on four interrelated processes (mirroring, reflecting, expressing, impressing). (Hatch and Schultz 2002, p. 991). National identity is a person’s identity or sense of belonging to one state or to one nation. (Ashmore, Jussim and Wilder, 2001). It is represented by a distinct tradition, culture and language. Compared to national identity organizational identity is more unstable and changeable. Conversely, national identity is more enduring as is it obtained through a person’s education and influence from childhood.

 

For example, I used to have a colleague who had been doing clerical work in a company dealing with paperworks. But for some reason, he switched to a sales job. He was not very talktive before he changed his job. Gradually, I found that he began to like to take the initiative to talk to others, and find a breakthrough in others’ words. The change in him is clearly characteristic of two different organizations.

 

 

 

Hatch, M. J. and M. Schultz (2002). ‘The dynamics of organizational identity’, Human Relations, 55 (8), pp. 989– 1018.

Ashmore, D., Jussim, L. and Wilder, D. (2001). Social Identity, Intergroup Conflict, and Conflict Reduction. Oxford University Press. pp. 74–75.

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