Question Description

“White People God. Chino God. Muslim God. Hindu God. Everybody wants a God. Not me! He’s like a teacher or a boss — wanting you to do everything exactly the way he says or he’ll punish you — for the rest of your life! I can do better than god…My father’s journey is contemplation. Mine is to be something more…” (Alfaro, Pg. 39-40).

Here Oedipus is pointing out that although many people desire a god in their life, he feels no need for one. Rather, that he should do the job himself. This is the first direct sign of what Oedipus is going to do. The prophecy outlines the events that will occur, but this passage gives a direct source of motivation for Oedipus. A time in the prison library, learning about religion with his father — the man who raised him — and realizing the role he wanted to play in this world. To reiterate, many things were said about the child who would one day kill his father and marry his mother. However, the child who would be doing so did not have a direct piece of evidence that said that they would actually do so. This passage reveals the natural motivation Oedipus has to go ahead and do the things he needed to do. A passage that hints at the true nature of Oedipus as the story unfolds.

1) Just because one has sight, does not mean that they are blind. Throughout this story, blindness and sight are recurring concepts in the play. In an earlier discussion, I talked about how love is blind. This is due to the fact that we are very good at filtering out any concept that interferes with our perception on something, or someone. Jocasta fails to see the instability of both Laius and Oedipus as she falls in love with both of them. Blindless is also seen as Jocasta refuses to accept the truth and makes Oedipus discover everything from Tiresias. I believe that the author is trying to tell people to listen to their instinct. Just because a mental image degrades the perception of someone we love, does not mean that it should be swept under the rug. It is not our eyes that become blind, but rather, our minds.

3) Tiresias’ depiction in this play makes him seem like a tragic hero. Perhaps not at first, but by the end that is how I perceive him. Tiresias is intially assigned possibly the most inhumane act that he will ever come across in his life. Laius’ ignorance to the whole thing did not rub off on Tiresias, but rather, I believe that motivated him to save the baby and give it the best possible life that he could. However, even through his best efforts, the prophecy unfolds exactly as it was told. Oedipus is quick to direct his anger at Tiresias when he discovers the truth, blind to the fact that Tiresias really did try to give him a life that would be free from the prophecy. At the end, the play depicts Oedipus as a blind man just like Tiresias as they both walk back into the prison. Despite his noble effort to give a life to a child unwanted by their own father, he ends up being the link that allows the prophecy to continue.