Question Description

Final Project Option:

You may choose to complete an annotated bibliography, as described here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/annotated_bibliographies/annotated_bibliography_samples.html

  • Use the APA style bibliography
  • The purpose should be to summarize AND evaluate the source in the ways discussed for the literature review (how is the methodology, etc.)

YOU MAY STILL SUBMIT A LITERATURE REVIEW, DESCRIPTION IS THE SAME AS BEFORE.

Literature Review

  1. Topic is “Law Enforcement Against Color” THE OUTLINE IS ATTACHED BELOW!!!!!
  2. Search the literature for at least 4 articles from peer-reviewed journals.
  3. Make sure you use articles that are cited often in other research (the library and Google scholar can help you figure this out).
  4. Write a literature review.
    1. 5 pages minimum, double-spaced, size 12 font, Times New Roman
    2. Arrange the research thematically- do not simply review each article
    3. What does the body of research tell us, on the whole?
    4. What questions or gaps in the literature remain?
    5. What might be some avenues of further studyà what should future research focus on? Any implications for policy/practice?
  5. Use APA format for in-text citations and Reference list (you don’t need to do a cover page, abstract, or running head unless you really want to practice those things)àCheck out this APA Resource guide for more help.

your lit review will be submitted via appropriate link online for safe assign. NO PLAIGARISM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have also included an example lit review paper for example………

What is a Literature Review?

A literature review discusses published information in a particular subject area.

A literature review has an organizational pattern and combines both summary and synthesis. A summary is a recap of the important information of the source, but a synthesis is a re-organization, or a reshuffling, of that information. It might give a new interpretation of old material or combine new with old interpretations. Or it might trace the intellectual progression of the field, including major debates. And depending on the situation, the literature review may evaluate the sources and advise the reader on the most pertinent or relevant.

What kind of literature review am I writing?

Thematic: Thematic reviews of literature are organized around a topic or issue, rather than the progression of time. However, progression of time may still be an important factor in a thematic review. For instance, the sperm whale review could focus on the development of the harpoon for whale hunting. While the study focuses on one topic, harpoon technology, it will still be organized chronologically. The only difference here between a “chronological” and a “thematic” approach is what is emphasized the most: the development of the harpoon or the harpoon technology. But more authentic thematic reviews tend to break away from chronological order. For instance, a thematic review of material on sperm whales might examine how they are portrayed as “evil” in cultural documents. The subsections might include how they are personified, how their proportions are exaggerated, and their behaviors misunderstood. A review organized in this manner would shift between time periods within each section according to the point made.

Start Writing (And Writing = Re-writing)

Once you’ve settled on a general pattern of organization, you’re ready to write each section. There are a few guidelines you should follow during the writing stage as well.

Here is a sample paragraph from a literature review about sexism and language to illuminate the following discussion:

“However, other studies have shown that even gender-neutral antecedents are more likely to produce masculine images than feminine ones (Gastil, 1990). Hamilton (1988) asked students to complete sentences that required them to fill in pronouns that agreed with gender-neutral antecedents such as “writer,” “pedestrian,” and “persons.” The students were asked to describe any image they had when writing the sentence. Hamilton found that people imagined 3.3 men to each woman in the masculine “generic” condition and 1.5 men per woman in the unbiased condition. Thus, while ambient sexism accounted for some of the masculine bias, sexist language amplified the effect. (Source: Erika Falk and Jordan Mills, “Why Sexist Language Affects Persuasion: The Role of Homophily, Intended Audience, and Offense,” Women and Language19:2).”

Use evidence

In the example above, the writers refer to several other sources when making their point. A literature review in this sense is just like any other academic research paper. Your interpretation of the available sources must be backed up with evidence to show that what you are saying is valid.

Be selective

Select only the most important points in each source to highlight in the review. The type of information you choose to mention should relate directly to the review’s focus, whether it is thematic, methodological, or chronological.

Use quotes sparingly

Falk and Mills do not use any direct quotes. That is because the survey nature of the literature review does not allow for in-depth discussion or detailed quotes from the text. Some short quotes here and there are okay, though, if you want to emphasize a point, or if what the author said just cannot be rewritten in your own words. Notice that Falk and Mills do quote certain terms that were coined by the author, not common knowledge, or taken directly from the study. But if you find yourself wanting to put in more quotes, check with your instructor.

Summarize and synthesize

Remember to summarize and synthesize your sources within each paragraph as well as throughout the review. The authors here recapitulate important features of Hamilton’s study, but then synthesize it by rephrasing the study’s significance and relating it to their own work.

Keep your own voice

While the literature review presents others’ ideas, your voice (the writer’s) should remain front and center. Notice that Falk and Mills weave references to other sources into their own text, but they still maintain their own voice by starting and ending the paragraph with their own ideas and their own words. The sources support what Falk and Mills are saying.

Use caution when paraphrasing

When paraphrasing a source that is not your own, be sure to represent the author’s information or opinions accurately and in your own words. In the preceding example, Falk and Mills either directly refer in the text to the author of their source, such as Hamilton, or they provide ample notation in the text when the ideas they are mentioning are not their own, for example, Gastil’s.

Information above adapted from the UNC Chapel Hill Writing Center, Literature Reviews