Every day, management life brings new decisions to be made and problems to be solved (Baldwin, Bommer, and Rubin, 2013). Before we can begin to fix a problem we must first know a few things. What caused the problem, understanding why it occurred, fixing it and prevention from it happening again. Case studies can provide a blueprint of situations that have occurred repeatedly in the past. The benefits of using case study methodology are experience, newly obtained knowledge, and providing solutions.

“Wisdom is with the aged, and understanding in length of days” ( Job 12:12). Experience will always be a great teacher when it comes to learning new things. Recently starting my new job in Dallas we were required to take training courses before we could begin work. I felt as if the training sessions were pointless due to the fact that it wasn’t over anything I’m using now. My best teacher has been the hands-on experience of working on assignments given and being able to grow and learn that way.

Obtaining new knowledge from problems is always good because it helps develop your analytical skills. Baldwin, Bommer and Rubin(2013) state that the first step in any good problem-solving is to define and structure the problem. Knowledge gained from working through something complex helps you deal with similar situations in future references. Baldwin, Bommer, and Rubin (2013) indicate that making decisions based upon the end results certainly should be an apart of responsible ethical decision making.

“Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding” ( Proverbs 3:5). Finding a solution to any problem or situation makes everyone’s job and life easier. Applying the case study methodology helps you analyze these issues and respond accordingly. The case study methodology also allows you to apply real-life current situations which gives more detail. Everyone’s solution isn’t always ethical and can possibly lead to termination. Parrot (2009) states that he once fired a professor for unethical conduct so the way you conduct yourself matters. We must always try and conduct ourselves in a way that God sees fit so when we come up with our solutions let’s make sure that they are ethical ones.

References:

Baldwin, T., Bommer, B. & Rubin, R. (2013). Managing organizational behavior: What great managers know and do (2nd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill-Irwin.

Parrott, R. (2009). The Longview: Lasting strategies for rising leaders. Colorado Springs, CO: David C. Cook.

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